Laparoscopy in the Elderly Population

Introduction:
The American Geriatric Society divides the population of people over 65 years of age into 3 groups: ‘young old’ aged 65-74, ‘middle old’ aged 75-84 and ‘old old’ aged more than 85. The aim of this study was to asses the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic surgery for elderly patients.
Methods:
Patients aged 65 and older were retrospectively identified from a prospective data base. General demographic information as well as related variants served as a basis for this report.
Results:
From January 2001 to August 2008, 423 patients aged 65 to 95 years underwent laparoscopic surgery. These patients were divided into 3 groups: 65-74 years of age (n=226), 75-84 years of age (n=163) and ±85 years of age (n=34). Surgical indications included adenocarcinoma (n=149), colonic polyps (n=100), diverticular disease (n=80) and others. Procedures included right hemicolectomy (n=161), sigmoidectomy (n=82), anterior resection (n=28), ileocolic resection (n=14), abdomino-perineal resection (n=9) and others. Procedures were elective in 90.4% (n=382). The average length of hospital stay for the ‘young’, ‘middle’ and ‘old’ groups were 6.7 days, 8.2 days and 11.4 days respectively (p < 0.002 for all groups) and the mortality rates were 0.5% (n=1), 2% (n=3) and 3% (n=1) respectively. The major morbidity rates were 1% (n=3), 2.4% (n=4) and 3% (n=1) respectively. The length of ICU admission was 3.5 days for the ‘young’ group and 7 days for the ‘old’ group (p =0.05).
Conclusions:
Although laparoscopic colorectal surgery is feasible in elderly patients, as age advances morbidity, length of ICU and overall hospital stay significantly increase from 65 to > 85 years of age.


Session: Poster

Program Number: P173

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