Laparoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair Surgery Patient Information from SAGES

After Surgery

What Should I Expect after Surgery?

  • Following the operation, you will be transferred to the recovery room where you will be monitored for 1-2 hours until you are fully awake.
  • Once you are awake and able to walk, drink liquids, and urinate, you will be sent home.
  • With any hernia operation, you can expect some soreness mostly during the first 24 to 48 hours.
  • You are encouraged to be up and about the day after surgery.
  • With laparoscopic hernia repair, you will probably be able to get back to your normal activities within a week. These activities include showering, driving, walking up stairs, lifting, working and engaging in sexual intercourse.
  • Call and schedule a follow-up appointment within 2 weeks after you operation.

Complications

What Complications Can Occur?

  • Any operation may be associated with complications. The primary complications of any operation are bleeding and infection, which are uncommon with laparoscopic hernia repair.
  • There is a very low risk of injury to the urinary bladder, the intestines, blood vessels, nerves or the sperm tube going to the testicle.
  • Difficulty urinating after surgery can occur and may require placement of a catheter, or tube to drain the bladder after surgery. You should ask your surgeon about ways to prevent this from occurring before your operation.
  • Bruising and swelling of the scrotum, the base of the penis, and the testicles is not uncommon with open and laparoscopic repair. This will gradually resolve on its own in the vast majority of patients.
  • Any time a hernia is repaired it can come back. This long-term recurrence rate is low in patients who undergo laparoscopic repair by an experienced surgeon. Your surgeon will help you decide if the risks of laparoscopic hernia repair are less than the risks of leaving the condition untreated.
  • It is important to remember that before undergoing any type of surgery–whether laparoscopic or open–you should ask your surgeon about his/her training and experience with the operation.

When to Call Your Doctor

Be sure to call your physician or surgeon if you develop any of the following:

  • Persistent fever over 101 degrees F (39 C)
  • Bleeding
  • Increasing abdominal or groin swelling
  • Pain that is not relieved by your medications
  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
  • Inability to urinate
  • Chills
  • Persistent cough or shortness of breath
  • Foul smelling drainage (pus) from any incision
  • Redness surrounding any of your incisions that is worsening or getting bigger
  • You are unable to eat or drink liquids

This brochure is not intended to take the place of your discussion with your surgeon about the need for laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery. If you have questions about your need for hernia surgery, your alternatives, billing or insurance coverage, or your surgeons training and experience, do not hesitate to ask your surgeon or his/her office staff about it. If you have questions about the operation or subsequent follow-up, please discuss them with your surgeon before or after the operation.

Color images: Atlas of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Jones DB, et al. Copyright 2006 Cine-Med.

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Brought to you by:

SOCIETY OF AMERICAN GASTROINTESTINAL AND ENDOSCOPIC SURGEONS (SAGES)
11300 West Olympic Blvd., Suite 600
Los Angeles, CA 90064
Tel:
(310) 437-0544
Fax:
(310) 437-0585
E-Mail:
publications@sages.org
Revised:
March 1, 2015
This brochure is intended to provide a general overview of a surgery. It is not intended to serve as a substitute for professional medical care or a discussion between you and your surgeon about the need for a surgery. Specific recommendations may vary among health care professionals. If you have a question about your need for a surgery, your alternatives, billing or insurance coverage, or your surgeons training and experience, do not hesitate to ask your surgeon or his/her office staff about it. If you have questions about the operation or subsequent follow up, discuss them with your surgeon before or after the operation.