The Stomach, Intestinal and Pylorus Sparing (SIPS) Procedure; a Single Center Analysis of Our First 100 Patients

Paul E Enochs, MD, FACS, FASMBS. BARIATRIC SPECIALISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA

Background:

The sleeve gastrectomy with a single anastomosis duodenal-intestinal bypass procedure has been gaining in popularity since first described by Dr. Torres several years ago.  It has gone by many names most notably the Stomach Intestinal and Pylorus Sparing surgery (SIPS).  However, there are few studies describing the results of these procedures.

 

Methods:

Using our internal practice database and electronic medical records, clinical data was obtained for our initial set of 100 Patients who underwent the SIPS procedure and compared with the data of those who underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and laparoscopic roux- en-y gastric bypass (RYGBP). Main outcomes were weight loss and 30 day risk adjusted serious morbidity and mortality.

 

Results:

We analyzed our first 100 patients who underwent a SIPS procedure and compared them to similar patients who underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and laparoscopic roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGBP).  The EWL at one year is greater with a SIPS procedure while the risk profile for SIPS, although slightly more than a sleeve gastrectomy (SG), is less than that of a roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGBP).  At six months there have been no appreciable metabolic or nutritional deficiencies compared to SG or RYGBP.

 

Conclusion:

The use of Laparoscopic SIPS procedures have been increasing on a national level.  Compared with our other bariatric procedures, the SIPS procedure is associated with a lower risk profile, an equivalent nutritional status, and increased weight loss.  Further studies will help to definitively define the role of this promising new procedure and how it plays within our bariatric armamentarium.

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