Skills Acquisition and procedural proficiency in Novices Using Virtual Reality

Amina Bouhelal, MBBS, MSc, Hitendra Patel, PhD, Reza Farhanandfar, MSc, Allan Benjamin, MSc, Badriya Alaraimi, MSc, Bijendra Patel, MS, FRCS

London Simulation Center , Barts Cancer Institute , Queen Mary University of London

Introduction: Surgical training has long relied on the Halstedian framework, the diminishing working hours, along with the ever-escalating procedural complexity; apprenticeship is no longer a valid choice to guarantee the supply of qualified safe surgeons to satisfy the demand.

Aim: Our study using a validated procedural specific, laparoscopic Cholecystectomy curriculum with expert performance as proficiency criteria, objectively investigated the possibility of skill acquisition and procedural proficiency using virtual reality

Methods: 30 novices were randomly recruited and trained on 9 basic tasks, 4 procedural tasks and full laparoscopic Cholecystectomy, on a high-fidelity, commercially available VR simulator, Lap Mentor, Simbionix, using a validated training curriculum with proficiency criteria.

Results: A total of 30 novices successfully completed the training curriculum & reached proficiency level in all tasks, (P<0.000) In basic tasks 5 the average time taken to finish the task decreased from 2:21 to 1:21 minute in mean total simulator time of 12:49 minute with average number trials of 7.3. In basic tasks 6 the average time taken to finish the task decreasing from 2:19 to 1:17 minute in mean total simulator of 12:20 minute with average number of trials of 7.2. In procedural task 3, participant’s average time taken to finish the task decreased from 7:48 to 3:43 minute in mean total simulator of 26:42 minute with average number of trials of 5.33 .In procedural task 4 the average time taken to finish the task decreased from 6:27 to 3:46 minute in mean total simulator of 27:40 minute with average number of trials of 5.2 The average time taken to finish the Full Procedural LC decreased from 9:57 to 7:10 minute in mean total simulator time of 30:04 minute with average number of trials of 3.4

Conclusion: the role of VR in surgical training is evident, in addition to the objective assessment VR provides, it also offers the long anticipated individualized focused training.


Session: Poster Presentation

Program Number: ETP016

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