Long-term Follow-up Shows No Difference in Port-site Hernia Incidence: Single Incision vs. Traditional Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

William H Pasley, MD, Christopher K Senkowski, MD, FACS

Memorial University Medical Center and Mercer University School of Medicine, Savannah, GA

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this studyis to demonstrate that single incision laparoscopy cholecystectomy (SILC) does not have an increased incidence of long-term port-site hernia rate when compared to traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (TLC).While much has been published regarding the safety and early complications of SILC, no such publications report long-term (>1 year follow-up) complications, i.e. port-site hernia.

MATERIALS/METHODS:A retrospective review of patients who underwent SILC/TLC from April 2008 through February 2011 was undertaken. Patients were mailed a copy of a questionnaire and then contacted via telephone to determine post-operative complications, focusing on port-site hernia. Patient demographics were gleaned from the medical record.The Fisher’s exact test was used to examine the significance of port-site hernia incidence between the two groups. Unpaired t-tests were used to compare patient demographics.

RESULTS:A total of 171 patients were eligible for the study with 89 patients undergoing SILC and 82 patients underwent TLC. 56patients (63%)in the SILC group and 39 patients (46%) in the TLC group were able to be contacted. Three patients reported a hernia in the SILC group. Four patients reported a hernia in the TLC group. Average follow-up was approximately 30 months in both groups. Except for patient BMI, no significant difference in patient demographics existed between the two groups.

CONCLUSION: With long-term follow-up at greater than 30 months there does not appear to be a difference in port-site hernia incidence with SILC. Further study through a randomized prospective study should be undertaken to confirm this study’s findings.


Session: Poster Presentation

Program Number: P604

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