Laparoscopic Training In Virtual Reality: Haptic Vs. None Haptic

Amina Bouhelal, Dr, S Badiani, Mr, Walid Elbakbak, Dr, Badriya S Alaraimi, Dr, Bijendra Patel, Mr. Barts Cancer Institute Queen Mary University of London.

Background: The efficacy of Simulation training is undoubtful, however the superiority of different simulators remains disputable. In our study, we examine the effect of haptic feedback on learning processes.

Methodology: 42 novices were randomly recruited and trained using validated training curriculum with proficiency criteria, using commercially available VR simulators, with and without haptic feedback.

Results: Thirty-nine novices completed the training curriculum and reached proficiency levels In the Haptic (HF): In basic tasks 5 proficiency reached in mean total simulator time (MTST) of 12:49 compared to 16:28 minute for none haptic (NHF), with average number trials of 7.3 compared to 7.7 respectively. In basic tasks 6, HF proficiency reached in MTST of 12:20 minute compared to 19:22 minute for NHF with average number of trials of 7.2 compared to 9 respectively. In procedural task 3 HF proficiency reached MTST of 26:42 minute compared to 59:19 minute for NHF with average number of trials of 5.33 compared to 12.4. In procedural task 4 HF proficiency reached in MTST of 27:40 compared to 1:05:25 minute for NHF with average number of trials of 5.2 compared to 8. In full Procedural LC HF proficiency reached in MTST of 30:04 compared to 1:27:43 minute for NHF with average number of trials of 3.4 compared to 8.1.

Conclusion: The superiority of haptic feedback is prominent exceptionally with increased task complexity . While both groups reached proficiency at rather close averages, the novices trained on haptic feedback simulator demonstrated faster learning curve and required less simulator time.

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