Ileostomy Reversal After Left Colonic or Rectal Resection for Cancer: Does the Initial Approach (laparoscopy Versus Laparotomy) Affect Outcome?

The aim of stoma in patients who had left colonic or rectal resection for cancer is to limit the consequences of anastomotic leakage. We retrospectively analyzed the short-term outcome of patients who had ileostomy reversal in this setting. Patients who had initial laparoscopic cancer resection were compared to those who had the same procedure openly.
The charts of all patients who had left colonic or rectal resection with anastomosis and ileostomy between 2004 and 2007 were reviewed.
164 consecutive patients were eligible for the study. 91 patients were initially operated by laparotomy (Group A) and 73 patients by laparoscopy (Group B). Mean time interval between cancer resection and stoma reversal was 14 weeks (8-27). Overall operative mortality was 2.2 % and 1.4 % in group A and group B, respectively. Mean operative duration was 61 min and 85 min in group A and group B, respectively (p < 0.05). Overall operative morbidity was 16.5 % and 17.8 % in group A and group B, respectively (p > 0.05). The length of hospital stay was 5.1 days (3-23) in group A and 6.3 days (2-32) in group B, respectively (p< 0,05).
Ileostomy reversal after left colonic or rectal resection for cancer seems to be associated with longer operative duration, increased morbidity and a longer hospital stay if the initial cancer resection was performed laparoscopically as compared to the open approach.


Session: Poster

Program Number: P159

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