Does Gender Affect Excess Weight Loss After Weight Loss Surgery?

Introduction: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y-Gastric Bypass (LRYGB) and Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) are the two most commonly performed weight loss procedures in the United States. The reported percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) after weight loss surgery varies from 50-80%. It is well known that the weight loss achieved with LRYGB is more significant early on compared to a LAGB especially in the first 6 month after surgery. Factors responsible for the wide range of %EWL reported in the literature remain a matter of debate. Few studies have looked at gender as a potential factor in determining post-operative %EWL. The aim of this study is to determine if the gender of the patient has any effect on the EWL. Methods: we performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on 303 patients that underwent weight loss surgery at Carolinas Medical Center (CMC) by a single surgeon from August 2006 to August 2009 either a LRYGB or LAGB. Among males, 58% of the patients underwent a LRYGB and 42 % had a LAGB. Among females, 73% underwent LRYGB and 27% had a LAGB. Given the fact that most of our female patients underwent a LRYGB, we expected to see higher %EWL in our female population, at least in the first few month. Our findings are shown in the following table:

%EWL

3month

%EWL

6month

%EWL

12month

%EWL

18month

%EWL

24month

Male

Total n=43

26.32%

n=41

32.23%

n=30

45.36%

n=21

42.85%

n=13

43.59%

n=7

female

Total n=260

28.94%

n=218

44.49%

n=207

57.83%

n=148

54.90%

n=78

52.98%

n=45

T-test

p=0.244

NS(Non-Significant)

p=0.001

S(Significant)

p=0.030

S

p=0.030

S

p=0.419

S

Our findings suggest that %EWL at 3 month is no different between males and females eventhough more females in our series underwent a LRYGB. Between 6 month and 18 month post-operative, females have a significantly higher %EWL than males. Conclusion: Gender may have a role in the %EWL achieved after weight loss surgery.


Session: Poster

Program Number: P057

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