Hernia Learning Theme

18.9% (n=241) of 2014 annual meeting attendees chose the Hernia learning theme.

Of 2014 annual meeting attendees interested in the Hernia learning theme, 28.9% (n=154) wanted to increase their use of the various minimal access laparoscopic procedures relating to hernia repair. At three-month follow-up, 25.8% of those responding (n=58) reported inability to fully implement the intended practice change.

Of 2014 annual meeting attendees interested in the Hernia learning theme, 23.3% (n=124) wanted to increase their use of new strategies related to MIS surgical issues. At three-month follow-up, 9.6% of those responding (n=42) reported inability to fully implement the intended practice change.

Of 2014 annual meeting attendees interested in the Hernia learning theme, 15% (n=80) wanted to increase their ability to correct common GI, HPB and abdominal wall disease processes. At three-month follow-up, 12.9% of those responding (n=31) reported inability to fully implement the intended practice change.

Of 2014 annual meeting attendees interested in the Hernia learning theme, 13.7% (n=73) wanted to increase their use of minimally invasive techniques to treat sick patients in the emergency setting. At three-month follow-up, 17.2% of those responding (n=29) reported inability to fully implement the intended practice change.

Of 2014 annual meeting attendees interested in the Hernia learning theme, 13.5% (n=72) wanted to increase their ability to manage common general surgery emergencies such as acute cholecystitis, diverticulitis, C. difficile colitis, and bowel obstructions. At three-month follow-up, 25% of those responding (n=24) reported inability to fully implement the intended practice change.

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