Colo-rectal cancer in Port Harcourt Nigeria: a multicentre analysis of lower gastro-intestinal endoscopies.

Emeka Ray-Offor, MBBS, FWACS, FMAS, DMAS1, Njideka C Aneke, MBBS2, Patrick O Igwe, MBBS1, Jacob M Adotey, FRCS1. 1University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria, 2Oak Endoscopy Centre Port Harcourt Rivers State nigeria


Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer mortality in countries of Europe, North America, Australia and Asia. A low incidence in Africa has been reported, albeit, an adenoma-carcinoma sequence is not disputed. Colonoscopy is the gold standard for investigating diseases of the colon but not common practice in our environment.


To study colonic diseases in our environment from an endoscopy perspective highlighting the incidence of precancerous and cancerous colonic lesions.

Patients and method

A prospective study of all consecutive patients who were referred to two private health facilities with Endoscopy units for lower gastro-intestinal endoscopy from June 2013 to July 2014. Variables studied were; sociodemographics, indication, endoscopic/histopathologic findings and outcome of CRC patients. Data were collated and analysed using SPSS version


A total of 40 flexible lower GI endoscopies were performed during the study period. There were 34 males and 6 females with age range of 27 to 86 years and a mean of 52.2 SD14.8 years. Screening was the indication for endoscopy in only one case.CRC was confirmed in 4(10%) cases with 3(8%) cases of polyps (inflammatory) and 1(3%)ulcerative colitis seen.All cases of colon cancer were advanced lesions with 3 left sided colonic lesions and a rectal cancer with liver metastases.Obstructed cases had colostomy preceding other treatment;one case had stoma created via laparoscopy.


Late presentation of CRC and rarity of premalignant lesions are the trend in our environment. A screening program with the benefit of early detection and probable cure is necessary.


Colorectal cancer, colonoscopy.

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